PROGRAM

Objectives of the course

Negotiation constitutes a strategic skill for managers, administrators, civil servants and many other professional careers. Be it internally (with colleagues, team members, or hierarchy), or externally (with stakeholders, national administrations or international organizations), negotiation capabilities can make a difference. This workshop will help students to:

  • gain an intellectual understanding of negotiators’ behavior and of central concepts in negotiation as they apply in the European Union institutional context;
  • improve their ability to analyze the negotiation situation and learn how to develop a toolkit of useful negotiation skills, strategies, and approaches adapted to work in the European institutional context;

 

Teaching and learning methods. The course will be based on a series of negotiation simulation and exercises. These are framed and analyzed in terms of readings, lectures, and in-depth class discussions.

The course will follow a three step sequential approach:

1. Experiential Learning through Simulations: Each week, students will engage in an exercise-simulation pertaining to a key aspect of negotiation in the EU.

2. Debriefing, Feedback & Self-Examination: Each week, the instructor will lead a discussion that involves analyzing students’ performance so that the class can analyze the relationship between different negotiation strategies and outcomes and learn from everyone’s experiences.

3. Framing concepts and discussion: Each week, the instructor will discuss with students the results of academic research that are connected with the seminar key learning points and the specific EU negotiation situation analyzed.

Number of Hours: 24 (divided into 6 sessions of four hours)
Evaluation: 30% class participation, 20% EUNEGOTIATIONLAB Blog participation, 50% Final Paper (3500 WORDS)

Content
SESSION 1 Understanding the key concepts and theories of negotiation
Simulation exercise: THE INTEREST RATE – A team negotiation over the crossing border conditions and access between two neighborhood countries.
• Three dimension of negotiation: people, substance, process
• Cooperation Vs. Competitive strategies,
• Consistency Vs. Pragmatism,
• Assertiveness Vs. Empathy,
• Principal Vs. Agent;
Readings: Lempereur A. , Colson A. (2010) The First Move, New York, Wiley, (Ch. 1)
Druckman, D. (2010) Negotiation, in N. Young (Ed.) The International Encyclopedia of Peace, New York: Oxford University Press.
Elgström, O. and Smith, M. (2000) “Negotiation and policy making in the European Union.”, Journal of European Public Policy, vol.7: n°5. pp 673-822.

SESSION 2 How to prepare and conduct a negotiation in team
Simulation: THE EU-KANDONESIA BILATERAL SUMMIT- EU delegation (Council, Commission and EEAS) preparatory meeting before a summit with an Asian “strategic partner”.
• 10 key trumps for effective preparation and agenda setting
• Typical models of negotiation dynamic and process
• Delegation and team management
Readings: Readings: Lempereur A. , Colson A. (2010) Méthode de négociation. Paris : Dunod, (Ch. 2)
Vanhoonacker S. et al. (2011) The Presidency in EU External Relations: Who is at the helm?, in Politique européenne, 2011/3 (n° 35) pp. 139-164

SESSION 3 Distributive and integrative Negotiations in the EU
Simulation: THE COOPERATION BUDGET- Team negotiation between the EU and a developing country on the yearly budget allocation
 Competitive and integrative negotiations
 Concession making
 Distributive vs. Procedural Justice
Readings: Lempereur A. , Colson A. (2010) Méthode de négociation. Paris : Dunod, (Ch. 4)
Marchi F. (2015) The Convention on the future of Europe: how states behave in a new institutional context of negotiation, Peter Lang, Brussels (Ch. 2 pp.35-53)

da Conceição-Heldt, E. (2006) “Integrative and Distributive Bargaining Situations in the European Union: What Difference Does It Make?”, in Negotiation Journal, Volume 22, Number 2, pp. 145-165(21)

SESSION 4 Negotiating an FTA agreement on behalf of the EU
Simulation: THE EU-KANDONESIA FTA- Bilateral negotiation of a chapter of an FTA agreement between the EU and an Asian country
 Preparation in team
 Consultation of stakeholders
 Internal and external communication
 Issue linkage and trade-offs
Readings: Conceição, E. (2014) When Speaking with a Single Voice Isn’t Enough: Bargaining Power (A)symmetry and EU External Effectiveness in Global Trade Governance, in Journal of European Public Policy 21(7): 980-995
Albin C., Druckman D. (2014) Procedures matter: Justice and effectiveness in international trade negotiations, in European Journal of International Relations, 20 (4) , pp. 1014-1042.

 

SESSION 5 Climate Change negotiations and the EU
Simulation: THE CLIMATE PREPARATORY MEETING – EU delegation preparatory meeting before a Climate Conference
 The leading negotiator approach
 Vertical Vs. horizontal disconnection
 The role of scientific expertise in negotiation
Readings: Readings: Delreux T. (2014) EU actorness, cohesiveness and effectiveness in environmental affairs, in Journal of European Public Policy, Vol. 21, Iss. 7, 2014
Niemann A. and Bretherton C. (2013) EU external policy at the crossroads: The challenge of actorness and effectiveness, in International Relations, 27 (3) , pp. 261-275.

SESSION 6 The External action of the EU in multilateral fora
Simulation: The KASLOWIA PEACE CONFERENCE– A multilateral meeting for a peace conference in which the EU and some Member States are represented to solve a major civilo-military crisis.
 The role of the Presidency and the Chair
 Formal Vs. informal negotiation
 Agreement Vs. Implementation
 Transparency Vs. secrecy in negotiations

Readings:
Zartman W. (1994) “Introduction: Two’s a Company more’s a Crowd: the Complexities of Multilateral Negotiations”, in Zartman W. (Ed) International Multilateral Negotiation: Approaches to the Management of Complexity, Jossey-Bass: San Francisco;
Vanhoonacker S. et al. (2011) The Presidency in EU External Relations: Who is at the helm?, in Politique européenne, 2011/3 (n° 35) pp. 139-164

Additional Readings:
Dupont, C. (1994) La Négociation. Conduite, théorie, applications. Paris : Dalloz
Elgström, O. (1994) “National Culture and International Negotiations” Cooperation and Conflict 1994; 29, pp. 289-301
Farrell, H. and Héritier, A. (2003b) “Formal and Informal Institutions Under Codecision: Continuous Constitution-Building in Europe”, in Governance, 16(4): 577-600.
Jabko, N. (2005) « Comment la France définit ses intérêts dans l’Union européenne » Revue française de science politique 2005/2 (Vol. 55) pages 221 à 242
Meerts P.W. and Cede, F. (2004) Negotiating European Union, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire; New York, N.Y., Palgrave Macmillan.
Pfetsch, F. (1998) “Negotiating the European Union” International Negotiation, vol.3: n°3, pp 289-514
Tallberg, J. (2008) “Bargaining Power in the European Council”, Journal of Common Market Studies, Volume 46, Issue 3, June 2008, pp. 685-708.
Tallberg, J. (2004) “The Power of the Presidency: Brokerage, Efficiency and Distribution in EU Negotiations”, Journal of Common Market Studies, Volume 42, Issue 5, December 2004, pp. 999-1022.
Zartman (I.W.) & Berman (M.) The Practical Negotiator. New Haven : Yale University Press,1992.
Zartman W. (1994) “Introduction: Two’s a Company more’s a Crowd: the Complexities of Multilateral Negotiations”, in Zartman W. (Ed) International Multilateral Negotiation: Approaches to the Management of Complexity, Jossey-Bass: San Francisco;

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